2010 ELECTIONS IN COTE D’IVOIRE: WHAT MOST MEDIA DO NOT TELL YOU

6 Jan

2010 Elections in Côte d’Ivoire: What most media do not tell you.
Posted December 4, 2010 –
By Aloysius AGENDIA (extracts)

Early November 2010, Ivoirians went to the polls to elect a new president. After the first round of elections, no candidate could get the absolute majority needed to avoid a runoff. Incumbent president Laurent Gbagbo of LMP scored 38 percent of the votes while former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara of PDR and former President Henri Konan Bedie got 32 and 25 percent respectively. The second round on November 28, 2010 pitted Ouattara against Gbagbo.

Konan Bedie urged his supporters to rally behind Ouattara. Analysts considered the call a marriage against nature because; it was the same Konan Bedie who made claims in the late 1990s and early 2000 that Ouattara was not an Ivoirian but actually a Burkinabe. That was the beginning of rivalry in Côte d’Ivoire.  From that perspective, it is hard to say with certainty if the supporters of Bedie could actually vote for Ouattara or massively vote for someone whom for years they consider more of their enemy than Laurent Gbagbo.


After the November 28 runoff, the [President of the] Independent Electoral Commission from a hotel hideout declared that Alassane Ouattara was winner of the elections with 54 percent of the votes as against 45 for Laurent Gbagbo. However, the victory was annulled moments later by the Constitutional Council of Cote d’Ivoire after it admitted claims and proofs from the Laurent Gbagbo camp that the elections were heavily flawed in the North which is controlled by the rebels of the Forces Nouvelles (they remain armed till date) said to be loyal to Alassane Ouattara.  More so, the elections result had not been declared within the stipulated time frame by law.

That notwithstanding, in a twist of events the United Nations and some countries like France, USA dismissed the statement of the Constitutional Council of Côte d’Ivoire and said in categorical terms that the results declared by the Electoral Commission were the right ones and valid and they would consider Alassane Ouattara as the president of Côte d’Ivoire.

The issue is that a lot of media organs in African have been relaying information from international press without knowing the ramifications of their actions.

It becomes very dangerous and troubling when media in Cameroon and most of Africa, get their news on elections in Côte d’Ivoire only from CNN, France 24, RFI or sister media, most of [these media] do analysis sometimes without knowing exactly what happened, or limiting their analysis to immediate actions without knowing what provoked the actions or again out rightly analyzing without taking into consideration what the law of that country says with respect to what they are analyzing.
The media, especially so called international bodies, international media and colonial troops stationed in Côte d’Ivoire must stop causing confusion and sowing disunity among people.

WHAT THE INTERNATIONAL MEDIA IS REFUSING TO ALSO STRESS OR MENTION:
– The report sheet of the majority of members of the Electoral Commission in the north of the country admitted that the elections were highly flawed in that area.

– They also refused to mention that results were canceled in virtually all of France where Gbagbo’s party had a resounding majority. Yet, the president of the Electoral Commission paid a blind eye on what happened in the north since he knew certain international media and countries will back his action.

– The international media is mentioning that the President of the Constitutional Council is pro Gbagbo but fails to admit that the President of the Electoral Commission as well as its Permanent Secretary and Spokesman are all pro Ouattara. What an unnecessary hype.

– The international media focuses on the tearing of results sheet  by a pro’-Gbagbo member of the EC. without investigating what provoked such actions. The action of the EC member was uncivil though.

– The international media fails to emphasize that the election results had not been harmonized before the spokesman rushing to make inflammatory declarations.

– The international media fails to equally reiterate that the results were released in a hotel hide out rather than from the Electoral Commission’s office and without other members of the Electoral Commission. They also fail to mention that this hotel was candidate Alassane Ouattara’s base.

– The international media fails to mention that in several areas in the North, Ouattara is said to have had more votes than all of the registered voters in the polling centres concerned. That can only happen in Cameroon under Paul Biya.

– The international media fails to mention that it is this the same Alassane Ouattara who has been accused of being  behind the rebellion in Côte d’Ivoire that killed several people. The rebellion then divided the country into two there by creating a country (North of Ivory Coast) within a country , that is Ivory Coast itselt. Ouattara has always refused this accusation though. However this video of one of the rebel commanders who Ouattara is said to have trained and sponsored is clear testimony..

– The international media has carefully avoided what other election observers like the AU and other independent monitors said about the elections. They prefer to hinge on what EU, French and UN team are claiming.

– The international media with the exception of BBC failed to relay or analyze an ultimatum given by French President and Foreign Minister to the EC of Côte d’Ivoire. It read “the election results MUST be published today” that was Wednesday December 01, 2010. Who are they to give ultimatums to a sovereign nation and what was the reason behind such an irritating statement?

– The international community represented by some powerful capitalists and imperialist bodies, think they can use the so called International Tribunal at The Hague to threaten nationalist African leaders.

– And finally, the whistleblower Wikileaks in one of its cables revealed that Nicholas Sarkozy is France’s closest American ally of all past French presidents since WWII. And you may not know the reason behind this. This is simply because Sarkozy needs the support of USA and allies in consolidating his grip on Africa and he wants to retake or re-colonize Africa and the rights Africans were beginning to take after some of us gained consciousness.  It is because of such backing that his country will mete out the most inhuman treatment on Africans in France, yet no nation/ international media would bother to talk about, less of making it a hype. Where is the RUPTURE he promised?

Please do not fall prey to the media psychological warfare. I know many of you are defeated already.

Let all colonial and neo-colonial troops leave Côte d’Ivoire and the same apply to all of Africa. That country can solve its problem without confusion being orchestrated by international troops and bodies there. Without people coming in the name of peace mission, maintaining their interest yet eventually ending up arming militias and rebels and intoxicating villagers.

Finally, if elections were rigged in the north of Côte d’Ivoire an area controlled by rebels and said to be loyal to Ouattara, then such elections must be cancelled. If not, Gbagbo should accept defeat, leave honourably and begin preparing for next elections.

France succeeded in Gabon with ‘Omar Bongo Ondimba Ali Ben’ after France-Afrique emperor Omar Bongo Ondimba I died. I pray and hope they do not succeed in Côte d’Ivoire again. Renaissance is needed.

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